Organic Growth

Organic Growth; a term I like to use when asked of the progress at Barn & Beach and my small band of Norfolk self-catering cottages.

Of course, I bang this drum often when discussing my gardens and allotment which of course have lots of Organic Growth, no chemicals pesticides or other undesirables in our gardens, don’t ya know!

Today has been a good day as I have seen a little Organic Growth on the cottages front too; well its not exactly a cottage this bit of Organic Growth is being constructed as I type.

Shepperd Hut, Norfolk, Cottage Holidays
Shepherd Hut in Progress

The stage is set, almost, last weeks storm surge at Walcott on the North Norfolk coast left us a bit untidy, however, it is nothing a digger and a spare day can’t put right….watch this space

The Plot, Shepherd Hut, Norfolk Holidays, Walcott, Bacton
The Plot Thickens

So as the plot thickens and the winter days quickly pass us by we are racing against time to have “Sandy’s Little Sister” in situ and ready for our first guests around about Easter time.

The Shepherd hut isn’t on Barn & Beach website yet but if your willing to take a chance or enjoy the thought of a blind date? do give us a tinkle and we will put your name down on the guest list for a  very reasonable sum!

Coming to a beach near you soon Barn & Beach’s first foray into the merry world of Glamping, I can guarantee it will be more Glam than cam, it truly is going to be a stunner.

Enjoy Organic Growth; Visit North Norfolk with Barn & Beach this Spring.

 

 

 

Blakeney Point North Norfolk

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point…

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable distraction from the stunning scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

An aerial view of the Blakeney Spit
Blakeney Point

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches. e.g Greenshanks

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

So this episode led to my discovery of what I now always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for those faint of heart.

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot for the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the estuary. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone… Visit with Barn & Beach Norfolk Holidays

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

 

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point.

 

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable addition to the scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

 

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches.

 

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

 

So this episode led to my discovery of what I know always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

 

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for the faint hearted.

 

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot fro the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

 

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

 

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the harbour. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

 

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

 

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

 

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone.

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

 

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point.

 

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable addition to the scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

 

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches.

 

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

 

So this episode led to my discovery of what I know always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

 

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for the faint hearted.

 

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot fro the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

 

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

 

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the harbour. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

 

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

 

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

 

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone.

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walcott

Walcott on the North East Norfolk coast is off radar to many visitors to the county, set among a cluster of attractive seaside villages; Bacton on Sea, Mundesley and Happisburgh

Walcott Beach
Beach Life Walcott

 Walcott is a centre of activity.

The only area of the coastline where the road parallels the seashore it is an ideal place to sit a watch the Beach Life below.

Now a centre for Water skiing, Jet Skis, Kayaks and bodyboards; sharing the vast beach front with the more select beach activities of paddling and swimming.

Barn & Beach offer fantastic Beach Houses for self-catering holidays, and a short stroll from the shore to a unique countryside setting of Meadowside Barn B&B ! Ensure plenty of accommodation options.

The village boasts, two good Public Houses with good menus, a cafe a village store and post office as well as the Walcott fish n chip shop that offers the best setting and fare on the coast…. a big claim? you have to come and try them, sat on the seawall looking out to sea it certainly adds an extra flavour.

If you have a holiday home in any of the four villages why not try http://barnandbeach.com/Ownhome.aspx for great rates, service and a truly professional approach to holiday letting.

Visit North Norfolk, Visit Walcott….