Blakeney Point North Norfolk

By webchoiceadmin On September 15, 2013 · Add Comment · Blakeney Point North Norfolk

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point…

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable distraction from the stunning scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

An aerial view of the Blakeney Spit
Blakeney Point

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches. e.g Greenshanks

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

So this episode led to my discovery of what I now always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for those faint of heart.

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot for the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the estuary. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone… Visit with Barn & Beach Norfolk Holidays

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

 

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point.

 

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable addition to the scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

 

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches.

 

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

 

So this episode led to my discovery of what I know always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

 

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for the faint hearted.

 

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot fro the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

 

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

 

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the harbour. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

 

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

 

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

 

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone.

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

Blakeney Spit

Protecting the bay and river at Blakeney is a spectacular spit formed by the tides. It is one of the few spits of its kind in the world and a spectacular place to visit.

 

There are a couple of ways to get out to the point.

 

One can ride on one of the many boat trips that operate out of the harbour to visit the seals that inhabit the sand banks at the mouth of the bay. These seal colonies can number hundreds at various times of the year and are a memorable addition to the scenery, which is outstandingly beautiful.

 

Have ‘done’ the trip on Beans boats, a local operator out of the village I was intrigued by the landscape having been allowed a short embark onto the shoreline of the spit. On this visit we saw ground-nesting birds on a large scale and several other species not normally encountered on most Norfolk beaches.

 

I then thought that I must visit the spit and old National Trust House at the tip by foot, on my first attempt I naively drove to Blakeney parked the car and set off to pay the salty old sea dog in the hut. Luckily he asked where I was off to and then set to putting me right! You can’t walk out to the spit from the harbour at Blakeney, well you may be able to but you would have to negotiate the salt marshes very carefully.

 

So this episode led to my discovery of what I know always refer to as ‘the’ Norfolk beach.

 

The walk out is achieved by using the car park on the salt marshes out by Cley. You can park out here for a nominal sum for the day. You need the day this one isn’t for the faint hearted.

 

Once you exit the car park with the sea in front of you you head down the beach to the left. The beach is actually a shingle spit and is very hard work under foot fro the first hour or so. Eventually the shingle gives way to sand and the walking becomes easier.

 

Compared to the boat trips from the harbour one certainly feels the isolation on this walk, having now completed the round trip several times I have encountered no more than a handful of fellow walkers on the spit. Once I took a resident of many years who declared they never knew it was there never mind walked it.

 

When I get the feeling that I’m approaching the end of the spit I head across the dunes to the big blue National Trust property that faces inward to the harbour. Among the dunes with the harbour in front of you and the village with its church tower off in the distance it’s a great spot to stop for lunch.

 

Lunch and rubbish put back in the bag a half hour or so with the binoculars is to be recommended as the wildlife is notable and some of the small vessels and the folk who work them are a joy to watch too.

 

Heading back to the mainland I firstly head right out on the golden expanse until I’m within viewing distance of the sand banks and seal colonies. It is a great finale to warm the heart before the long hard walk back to the car.

 

A Norfolk Beach in its true natural glory, don’t tell anyone.

 

(words approx 560)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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